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Events and News

Talks

Prof. Dr. Gerd Gigerenzer
Director of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy

Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin

"Risiko: Wie man die richtigen Entscheidungen trifft“
 

In dieser Welt ist nichts gewiss, außer dem Tod und den Steuern – so schrieb Benjamin Franklin vor mehr als 200 Jahren. Dennoch suchen auch heute noch Menschen nach Gewissheiten die nicht existieren, und kaufen Horoskope und Marktvorhersagen, welche meistens wertlos sind. Risikokompetenz ist die Fähigkeit, die Gefahren und Möglichkeiten einer technologischen Welt zu verstehen statt diese zu verdrängen, und mit Unsicherheit emotional entspannt leben zu lernen. Unsere Gesellschaft ist von einem rationalen Umgang mit Risiken noch weit entfernt, ein Zustand, der jedes Jahr beträchtliche finanzielle Mittel, Ängste und das Leben von Bürgern kostet. In diesem Vortrag geht es um Techniken der Kommunikation von Risiken, um die Psychologie des Risikos, und um die Illusion der Gewissheit.

03.06.2019, 19:00 Uhr, Wolkenstein-Saal des Kulturzentrums Konstanz

 

News

Why do people despite many disadvantages drink bottled water? Luka Johanna Debbeler was interviewed by Jochen Paulus (WDR5 Quarks) about this question. The radio interview can be accessed here.

 

News

The Society of Risk Ananlysis Europe (SRA-E) estabilished a German-speaking Chapter (DACHL) in Östersund in 2018, during the SRA-Europe 27th conference. The objectives are to promote risk research, knowledge and understanding of risk analysis techniques within the German-speaking regions, such as Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and South Tyrol.

Josianne Kollmann and Luka Johanna Debbeler are founding members and were chosen as representatives of young researchers in the Board of Directors of the SRA-E DACHL Chapter.

 

Talks

Dr. Angela Bearth
Consumer Behavior, Institute for Environmental Descisions
ETH Zürich

Perceptions and acceptance of existing and emergent technologies

Research into people’s risk and benefit perceptions of existing and emergent technologies (e.g., chemicals, irradiation) suggests that, due to resource restraints (e.g., time, motivation, knowledge) consumers’ perceptions and decisions are frequently formed based on heuristics and biases or other non-analytical factors, such as trust or affect. In this talk, I am going to present findings from our research into technology perception and acceptance for selected examples (e.g., food risks, toxicological principles, food irradiation).

01.02. 2019, 13:30 Uhr, G 530

 

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Ebner-Priemer
Institut für Sport und Sportwissenschaft (IfSS)
KIT Karlsruhe

Mobiles Assessment - Methodische und technische Entwicklungen

In my talk, I will focus on four different examples of Ambulatory Assessment to illustrate challenging opportunities: a) utilizing high frequency data assessment to model affective dynamics, b) using location-triggered e-diaries to investigate the relation between stress-reactivity and environmental components, c) monitoring physical activity and telecommunication behaviour to predict upcoming episodes in bipolar patients and d) implementing experimental manipulation in everyday life to deepen our understanding of rumination processes.

17.01. 2019, 17.00 Uhr, G 530

 

Dr. Claude Fischler
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
Paris, France

Why Nutrition is (should be) a Social Science

In his presentation “Why Nutrition is (should be) a Social Science” Dr. Fischler shows that eating is both the primary biological function and the primary determinant for early social organisation. Nutrition needs to be interdisciplinary to take this into account: It should integrate socio-anthropological, psychological and nutritional approaches.

The full presentation can be viewed via the following link:

Presentation Claude Fischler (Oct 31 2018)

31.10.2018

 

Prof. Dr. Paul Rozin
Department of Psychology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

The Modern Food World: Meat, Morality, Technology and Sustainability

In his presentation “The Modern Food World: Meat, Morality, Technology and Sustainability”, Prof. Rozin describes the modern omnivore’s dilemma: having to choose from a virtually endless array of foods. He shows that food choice often has a moral component. Also, he analyzes opposition to new technology, such as genetic engineering. Last, he discusses the fact that large scale consumption of insects could solve many of the world’s food security problems as well as many environmental problems. He also considers the nature of opposition to consuming insects, mainly motivated by disgust.

The full presentation can be viewed via the following link:

Presentation Paul Rozin (Oct 30 12018)

30.10.2018

 

Dr. Renato Frey
Center for Cognitive and Decision Sciences
Department of Psychology, University of Basel

Risk preference: Its psychometric structure, measurement, and
an outlook on testing its generalizability to important life outcomes

Risk preference is considered to be a key building block of human behavior, particularly so
in psychology and economics. Yet little research has been conducted that integrates
different measurement traditions, which have co-evolved largely in isolation from each other.
Fundamental questions regarding the nature of the construct risk preference have thus
remained unaddressed to date. I present evidence from a large-scale study, in which we
collected 39 risk-taking measures from 1,507 participants (spanning three different
measurement traditions, and including a retest subsample of 109 participants), suggesting
that risk preference shares its psychometric structure with that of other major psychological
traits: A general and stable factor of risk preference (“R”) as well as a set of more specific
factors each accounted for about half of the explained variance. Our findings highlight
several problems of using incentivized behavioral methods for eliciting risk preference. In the
second part of the talk, I discuss potential sources underlying the general factor of risk
preference, and give a preview of future work in which I will test the generalizability of risk
preference to important life outcomes by means of predictive modeling.

19.06.2018

 

Dr. Andreas Neubauer
Deutsches Institut für Internationale Pädagogische Forschung (DIPF), Frankfurt a.M.

Alltagsnahe Diagnostik: Inter-individuelle Unterschiede in intra-personalen Effekten

Risk preference is considered to be a key building block of human behavior, particularly so
in psychology and economics. Yet little research has been conducted that integrates
different measurement traditions, which have co-evolved largely in isolation from each other.
Fundamental questions regarding the nature of the construct risk preference have thus
remained unaddressed to date. I present evidence from a large-scale study, in which we
collected 39 risk-taking measures from 1,507 participants (spanning three different
measurement traditions, and including a retest subsample of 109 participants), suggesting
that risk preference shares its psychometric structure with that of other major psychological
traits: A general and stable factor of risk preference (“R”) as well as a set of more specific
factors each accounted for about half of the explained variance. Our findings highlight
several problems of using incentivized behavioral methods for eliciting risk preference. In the
second part of the talk, I discuss potential sources underlying the general factor of risk
preference, and give a preview of future work in which I will test the generalizability of risk
preference to important life outcomes by means of predictive modeling.

14. Juni 2018

 

Dr. Gareth Hollands
Behaviour and Health Research Unit, University of Cambridge

Automatic for the People: Changing environments to change population health behaviour outside awareness

Much of the global burden of non-communicable disease is caused by unhealthy behaviours that individuals
engage in even when informed of their health-harming consequences. To date, interventions to address this
have largely encouraged people to reflect on their behaviours. However, these behaviours are often not
driven by deliberative conscious decisions, but occur directly in response to environmental cues and without
a great deal of conscious reflection. Consequently, interventions that target non-conscious rather than
conscious processes to change behaviour may have significant - if largely untested - potential to change
population health behaviour. This talk will aim to explore this premise and highlight some relevant current
research on the topic.

 

Dr. Petra Dickmann

Risikokommunikation in internationalen Gesundheitsnotfällen - Lessons von Ebola

Die Internationalen Gesundheitsvorschriften der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) erwartet von allen Mitgliedsländern eine grundlegende Kompetenz ("core capacities"), Gesundheitsgefahren vorzubeugen, früh zu erkennen, und effektiv zu bewältigen. Risikokommunikation ist eine dieser acht Core Capacities. Das Verständnis von Risikokommunikation hat sich allerdings in den letzten 10-15 Jahren entscheidend geändert: stand früher eher die Kommunikation von Risiken von Experten zu einer Allgemeinbevölkerung im Vordergrund, wird Risikokommunikation zunehmend als eine Möglichkeit verstanden, eine gemeinsame Verständnisgrundlage und eine handlungsfähige Beziehung aufzubauen. An dem Beispiel eines Internationalen Gesundheitsnotfalles, dem Ebola Ausbruch in Westafrika, werden die Chancen und Schwierigkeiten dieses neuen Verständnisses von Risikokommunikation vorgestellt und diskutiert.

 

Studies

Konstanz Life Study 2017